« Crowdfunding (aka P2P Lending): The First Pure Internet-Induced Disruption in Financial Services | Main | Card Transaction Data is Rich, Who Will Help Users Mine It? »

Mobile Monday: USAA Taps the Mobile Camera for New Account Opening

By Jim Bruene on January 14, 2013 6:14 AM | Comments

USAA ipad app offers mobile check deposit The smartphone has already changed the way we work, communicate, find information, and behave. But it's had a limited role so far in bank-account opening (note 1).

But leave it to USAA, the pioneering bank for all things mobile (note 2) to lead the way again. First reported this week in American Banker, USAA is testing the use of "blank check" capture to make it easier for certain new customers (note 3) to make their initial deposit (note 4).

Customers can snap a picture of a blank check from their old account and then enter the amount to be transferred electronically (note 5). It's not really any faster, actually probably slower, than simply typing in a checking account and routing number (twice). But given how frustrating data entry can be on a mobile, some users will love it.

More importantly, it introduces users immediately to mobile capture and removes one more barrier to getting that first deposit on the books. And it makes USAA look cool.

-----------------------------------------

Notes:
1. At Finovate, we've seen the mobile camera used in a number of interesting ways. oFlows (now a part of Andera), wowed the crowd in 2009/2010 with various paperless account-opening and -processing technologies (for example, check out its FinovateSpring 2010 "Best of Show" demo).
2. USAA launched mobile remote deposit 18 months before any other major bank and a full 3 years before Bank of America (see our 2009 post).    
3. Only certain USAA members are eligible to use mobile deposit (generally, those with military service or their family members who have acceptable credit).
4. Unfortunately, USAA doesn't yet support full mobile account opening. New customers must first go online and establish a new account and register a username and password. Then they must go to USAA mobile banking, log in, then take a picture of the blank check. Furthermore, only certain USAA members are eligible to use mobile deposit.
5. In the United States, the funds are moved via ACH, a little-understood system that banks could do a better job explaining to customers. See a rundown of the mysteries of ACH from the customer's standpoint in this enlightening Deposit Account post from yesterday.

Comments

Most Recent Posts:

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.netbanker.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-t.cgi/2780

Upcoming Events

Recent Research

  • NEW! Mobile Banking Security: The new channel is a boon for improving security, both real and perceived - Find out more
  • NEW! Money 3.0: Payments Go Mobile Apple, Bitcoin, & mobile apps are changing the game. What’s a bank to do? - Find out more
  • NEW! Digital Banking Forecast: Current, future and historical usage: 1994 to 2023 - Find out more

 

   

RSS Subscribe via RSS
RSS Subscribe to Comments



Email:


@NetBanker Twitter Feed



See all @NetBanker tweets